Fashion

GABRIELE PASINI – OPENING SOON IN L.A.

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GABRIELE PASINI – OPENING SOON IN L.A.

Announcing the upcoming grand opening in Los Angeles of the Gabriele Pasini Store located at 8268 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood.
#LOSANGELES  #MELROSE8268  #WESTHOLLIWOOD  #OPENSOON  #GPSHOP  #LARDINIOFFICIAL

Gabriele Pasini, from the Neapolitan region of Italy where tailoring reconsiders the British tradition key in an aesthetic fashion linked to the new man yet formed with urban dandy, exasperating lines and details to build a sophisticated sense of elegance. The collections of Gabriele Pasini focus’ on the complete three-piece suit and vest, with meticulous attention to detail and the use of vintage fabrics in continuous switching between Italian and British tradition.

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Drawing strong inspiration from aesthetics dandy in its most sober and less “fashionable”, Gabriele customizes’ each piece while working on its particular fit, with strong attention to detail. The lapels and buttons are made by goldsmiths of Vicenza, as well as Como silk neckties, all aspects of his fashion line are complete with custom made high personal taste bordering on the obsessive.

Gabriele says of himself: “You can say that I am self-taught. I grew up and matured within the tailors, especially those of Naples. In Italy we have great schools for tailors, but in my mind the Neapolitan school is the most complete. In some regards I’m a fabric freak, I love the selection of materials from the simplest to the most complex, with a priority for the draperies as well as vintage and retro fabrics.

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How is my style?  “I have drawn inspiration and mixed the stylings of Mick Jagger and David Bowie, as well as combining Italian and English fabrics from the seventies”. All suits are three pieces complete with the vest, in order to confirm with the desired elegance of men, with careful attention to detail and finishes. All the while increasing a new etiquette and elegance of men’s fashion.

Click here for SLIDE SHOW ⬇︎

Kathy Kifer

Editing by :  Alessandro Sicuro & Sure-com America Media production

Special Thanks :

Sara Dal Monte – Los Angeles CA – USA

Kathy Kiefer Blog NY – USA

Sure-com America NY USA

Alessandro Sicuro Comunication

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copyright © sure-com America web Agency

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SOME CURRENT TRENDS IN FASHION ACCESSORIES

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SOME CURRENT TRENDS IN FASHION ACCESSORIES

While I realize that the summer season has just begun, it’s never too early to start getting your wardrobe ready for fall complete with some of the latest trends in fashion accessories. I have also included information on some accessories if one is still looking to add to their summer wardrobe.

From Chanel’s slogan bracelets and Valentino’s ring stack; to Diesel Black Gold’s syncable watch and Rodarte’s neo-piercings, the jewelry trends you can expect to see on the street for Summer 2015 from New York, Milan and Paris

With blood-red flowers clipped into the hair and matador -inspired jackets, the Dolce & Gabbana Spring/Summer 2015 collection boasts a sultry, Spanish flair. To complement the dramatic silhouettes, the designer duo opted for golden pendant earrings and necklaces, gleaming as they caught the lights on the runway.

Chanel’s fashion riot for Summer 2015 has seen bangles in silver and brightly colored leather with the same on -trend demo slogans that the girls brandished in the finale, including “Make Fashion Not War”, “Oser Sans Poser” and “Ladies First”.  Karl Lagerfeld and the Chanel girls wore their hearts on their sleeves.

Mirroring the contours of the Summer 2015 collection, the Versace necklaces came in two different styles: a choker that has been paired with the short dresses and a fine chain with a medallion to contrast with the tuxedo.   An experiment with layering was also conveyed in the sport-chic t-shirts of the collection.

In an invitation to travel during the summer, the creative duo behind Valentino peppered the Summer 2015 looks with marine symbols. Coral, shells and sea urchins replaced last summer’s signs of the zodiac, translating into sun-bright rings to mix and match all season.

With jewelry crafted from wood and natural materials, the accessories at the Marni Summer 2015 show captured the artisan spirit of the fashion house and affirmed its reputation as the height of Italian craftsmanship.

For his final show as creative director at Hermes, Christophe Lemaire accessorized his ivory and sand-colored looks with solid silver jewelry from another in-house talent, Pierre Hardy. Pale, bright pieces from the Spring/Summer 2015 collection referenced the contours of bridles, bits and reins.

Secured with cuffs or a golden chocker, the jewelry worn by the Balmain Summer 2015 warriors, played a key role in the show, experimenting with both transparency and constricted lines.

125 years of Lanvin- with Alber Elbaz currently at the helm, saw a fresh take on the French classic. The jewelry designer Elie Trop played with the traditional white pearl, suspending it like an abacus, from a silver necklace. New ground for the Parisienne’s game.

Accessories picked up on the Summer 2015 themes as the clothes at Fendi, as the orchid motif featured on low-slung ponytails and denim blue popped up on oversized knotted leather cuffs. As if by magic, the delicate feathers of light bustier dresses also appeared around watches.

A wave of fashion freedom broke at the Etro show in Milan, as sun-drenched California Dreamin’ inspiration saw folky fabrics blend with dreamcatcher jewelry worked from raw stones, beads and feathers mingle with long hair, left loose over the shoulders.

It was a tribal call for the Isabel Marant Summer 2015 collection, with a relaxed, mostly monochrome silhouette. The bangle, perched delicately upon the forearm, punctuated an otherwise clean look.

With multicolored fur, knotted scarves, suede jackets or all denim ensembles, this season, Frida Giannini celebrated signature, Gucci-style pieces. The golden age of the Seventies was brought bang up to date and spelt loud and clear by the iconic monogram bracelet, in silver, that encircled the wrist.

With Crystals mounted on necklaces, sand-colored breastplates and subtle animal-print earrings, the jewelry at the Giorgio Armani Summer 2015 show toyed with the natural charm of the collection. With the exception of graphic earrings, adding a punk edge to the collection with stylized safety-pin pendants.

A selection of quartz crystals, mounted onto a strip of transparent leather, in the same chocolate tones of the standout Amazon dress from the Givenchy Summer 2015 collection.

Sporting peroxide blonde hair, bubble-gum pink lips, roller-blades and aerobics attire, the Moschino girl was a tribute to the plastic superstar, Barbie on the runway for Summer 2015. Jeremy Scott reinvented the famous Mattel doll, amping up her style credentials with Peace & Love earrings and a multitude of gold chains adorned with Moschino charms.

Getting your wardrobe ready for fall with the latest trends also includes some big changes when it comes to your accessories. Dramatic shoes are in this season, including fur stilettos and bondage-inspired lace up boots, but if you’re already familiar with the shoes you want for next season, check out the biggest Fall accessories trends.

From jewelry to bags and even elbow-length gloves, here are some of the trends that proved extremely popular at Fashion Week, from New York to Milan.

Coming back in a fresh way that has nothing to do with your grandmother’s brooches, this piece of jewelry is having a big moment this fall. Oversized brooches are adorning everything from coats and tops to shoes.  From Balenciaga and Prada to Edun and Dolce & Gabbana, dramatic brooches flooded the runways, and you shouldn’t miss out on this cool trend.

One of the biggest Fall 2015 accessories trends, fringe was already riding high this spring, and there’s no reason to abandon it once the weather gets cooler. Invest in a fringe bag, whether you like ‘70s inspired fringe or the more Western version of it. Emilio Pucci, Altuzarra, and Burberry Prorsum were just a few labels that showcased gorgeous fringe handbags on the runways at Fashion Week.

The right way to fight the cold weather this fall, berets proved a hit on the runways. Whether you prefer a simply woolly one or a more dramatic, embellished beret, you’ll be able to pull it off the right, if Fashion Week is any indication. Gucci, Paul & Joe, Luisa Beccaria, and Fay had runway shows with plenty of beret inspiration.

Wide belts are definitely one of the big Fall 2015 accessories trends, but you can still be trendy if you prefer the skinny or twisted varieties. The trick is to make sure that they have a big buckle. Roberto Cavalli, Versace, Roksanda Ilincic, and Salvatore Ferragamo proved that the belt is the perfect fall accessory, and can also double as a gorgeous piece of jewelry.

It’s been around since last fall, but the trend of the single earring doesn’t seem to be on its way out at all. Plenty of designers chose to showcase big and dramatic earrings, just one per model. Dior, Balmain, Tibi, and Anteprima used gorgeous statement earrings, from unique metallic designs to really embellished earrings.

If you plan on wearing a scarf this fall, make sure that it’s slim and tied around your neck. This menswear-inspired look definitely hits plenty of feminine notes, since the right way to rock a scarf is to have it hit below the waist. It’s one of the best Fall 2015 accessories trends, after making a big splash at Fashion Week during shows from House of Holland and Chloé to Tory Burch.

After Amal Clooney showed off gorgeous long gloves at the 2015 Golden Globes, it seems like they’re turning into a really interesting fall trend. The dramatic length definitely makes them sophisticated, but they’re not for everyone. Marc Jacobs, Dries van Noten and Prada experimented with different colors and lengths, but the common ground are elbow-length luxe leather gloves.

Fur shoes are definitely a strong fashion statement, but the stole is a lot more accessible, whether it’s real or faux. It’s one of the Fall 2015 accessories trends that goes best with the wide belt one, since the right way to wear a fur stole seems to be tucked into the belt. Michael Kors and Roksanda Ilincic impressed with the best fur stole looks on the runway.

Big bags are another big trend for fall. While Balmain, Moschino, and Fendi went for oversized bags that stand out, another popular trend was the matchy-matchy look. The Row and Boss showcased oversized bags that were perfectly matched to coats.

If a long flowing scarf tied to your neck is not for you, you can still try one of the most interesting Fall 2015 accessories trends with the wide choker. Altuzarra, Ohne Titel and Tome proved that the look really works, even if it’s just a stretchy headband around your neck.    There are also many up and coming designers just waiting to be discovered that may have just be what you are looking for as well.   It’s worth checking them out as well.   You won’t be disapppointed.

Kathy Kiefer

THE USE OF SUNGLASSES

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THE USE OF SUNGLASSES

People may also wear sunglasses to hide an abnormal appearance of their eyes. This can be true for people with severe visual impairment, such as the blind, who may wear sunglasses to avoid making others uncomfortable. The assumption is that it may be more comfortable for another person not to see the hidden eyes rather than see abnormal eyes or eyes which seem to look in the wrong direction. People may also wear sunglasses to hide dilated or contracted pupils, bloodshot eyes due to drug use, recent physical abuse, bulging eyes, a cataract, or eyes which jerk uncontrollably.

The European standard EN 1836:2005 has four transmittance ratings: “0” for insufficient UV protection, “2” for sufficient UHV protection, “6” for good UHV protection and “7” for “full” UHVV protection, meaning that no more than 5% of the 380 nm rays are transmitted. Products which fulfill the standard receive a CE mark. There is no rating for transmittance protection for radiation of up to 400 nm, as required in other countries (incl. the United States) and recommended by experts. The current standard EN 1836:2005 was preceded by the older standards EN 166:1995 (Personal eye protection –Specifications), EN167: 1995 (Personal eye protection – Optical test methods), and EN168: 1995 (Personal eye protection – Non-optical test methods), which in 2002 were republished as a revised standard under the name of EN 1836:1997 (which included two amendments). In addition to filtering, the standard also lists requirements for minimum robustness, labeling, materials (non-toxic for skin contact and not combustible) and lack of protrusions (to avoid harm when wearing them).

Sunglasses sold in the United States are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and are required to conform to safety standards. The U.S. standard is ANSI Z80.3-2001, which includes three transmittance categories. According to the ANSI Z80.3-2001 standard, the lens should have a UVB transmittance of no more than one per cent and a UVA transmittance of no more than 0.3 times the visual light transmittance. The ANSI Z87.1-2003 standard includes requirements for basic impact and high impact protection. In the basic impact test, a 1 in steel ball is dropped on the lens from a height of 50 in. In the high velocity test, a 1/4 in steel ball is shot at the lens at 150 ft/s. To pass both tests, no part of the lens may touch the eye.

When driving a vehicle, particularly at high speed, dazzling glare caused by a low sun, or by lights reflecting off snow, puddles, other vehicles, or even the front of the vehicle, can be lethal. Sunglasses can protect against glare when driving. Two criteria must be met: vision must be clear, and the glasses must let sufficient light to get to the eyes for the driving conditions. General-purpose sunglasses may be too dark, or otherwise unsuitable for driving.

Graduated lenses, with the bottom part lighter than the top, can make it easier to see the controls within the car. All sunglasses should be marked as meeting the standard for the region where sold. An anti-reflective coating is recommended, and a hard coating to protect the lenses from scratches. Sunglasses with deep side arms can block side, or peripheral, vision and are not recommended for driving.   Even though, some of these glasses are proven good enough for driving at night, it is strongly recommended not to do so, due to the changes in a wide variety of light intensities, especially, while using yellow tinted protection glasses. The main purpose of these glasses, are to protect the wearer from dust and smog particles entering into the eyes while driving at high speeds.

Many of the criteria for sunglasses worn when piloting an aircraft are similar to those for land vehicles. Protection against UV radiation is more important, as its intensity increases with altitude. Polarized glasses are undesirable as aircraft windscreens are often polarized, intentionally or unintentionally, showing Moire patterns on looking through the windscreen; and some LCD displays used by instruments emit polarized light, and can dim or disappear when the pilot turns to look at them   as do corrective glasses, sunglasses have to meet special requirements when worn for sports. They need shatterproof and impact-resistant lenses; a strap or other fixing is typically used to keep glasses in place during sporting activities, and they have a nose cushion.

Special protection is required for space travel because the sunlight is far more intense and harmful than on Earth, where it is always filtered through the atmosphere. Sun protection is needed against much higher UV radiation and even against harmful infrared radiation, both within and outside the spacecraft. Within the spacecraft, astronauts wear sunglasses with darker lenses and a thin protective gold coating. During space walks, the visor of the astronauts’ helmets, which also has a thin gold coating for extra protection, functions as strong sunglasses. The frames of sunglasses and corrective glasses used in space must meet special requirements. They must be flexible and durable, and must fit firmly in zero-gravity. Reliable fit is particularly important when wearing corrective glasses underneath tight helmets and in space suits: once inside the spacesuit, slipped glasses cannot be touched to push them back into place, sometimes for up to ten hours. Frames and glasses must be designed so that small pieces of the glasses such as screws and glass particles cannot become dislodged, then float and be inhaled. 90% of astronauts wear glasses in space, even if they do not require corrective glasses on Earth, because zero-gravity and pressure changes temporarily affect their vision.

The first sunglasses used in a Moon landing were the original pilot sunglasses produced by American Optical. In 1969 they were used aboard the Eagle, the lunar landing module of Apollo 11, the first manned mission to land on the Moon. NASA research primarily by scientists James B. Stephens and Charles G. Miller at the JET Propulsion Laboratory resulted in special lenses that protected against the light in space and during laser and welding work. The lenses used colored dyes and small particles of zinc oxide, which absorbs ultraviolet light and is also used in sunscreen lotions. The research was later broadened to further terrestrial applications, e.g., deserts, mountains, and fluorescent-lighted offices, and the technology was commercially marketed by a U.S. company. Since 2002 NASA used the frame of the designer model Titan Minimal Art of the Austrian company Silhouette, combined with especially dark lenses developed jointly by the company and NASA optometrist Keith Manuel. The frame is very light at 1.8 grams, and does not have screws or hinges that could detach.

The color of the lens can vary depending on style, fashion, and purpose, but for general use, red, grey, green, or brown are recommended to avoid or minimize color distortion, which could affect safety when, for instance, driving a car or a school bus. Gray and green lenses are considered neutral because they maintain true colors. Brown lenses cause some color distortion, but also increase contrast.   Turquoise lenses are good for medium and high light conditions, because they are good at enhancing contrast, but do not cause significant color distortion. Yellow is “optimum for object definition, but creates a harsh visible light”; amber “allegedly makes distant objects appear more distinct, especially in snow or haze. These lenses are popular with skiers, hunters, boaters and pilots.”   Blue or purple lenses are mainly cosmetic.

A mirrored coating can be applied to the lens. This mirrored coating deflects some of the light when it hits the lens so that it is not transmitted through the lens, making it useful in bright conditions; however, it does not necessarily reflect UV radiation as well. Mirrored coatings can be made any color by the manufacturer for styling and fashion purposes. The color of the mirrored surface is irrelevant to the color of the lens. For example, a gray lens can have a blue mirror coating, and a brown lens can have a silver coating. Sunglasses of this type are sometimes called mirror shades. A mirror coating does not get hot in sunlight and it prevents scattering of rays in the lens bulk.

Frames are generally made of plastic, nylon, metal, or a metal alloy.   Nylon frames are usually used in sports because they are lightweight and flexible. They are able to bend slightly and return to their original shape instead of breaking when pressure is applied to them. This flex can also help the glasses grip better on the wearer’s face. Metal frames are usually more rigid than nylon frames, thus they can be more easily damaged when the wearer participates in sport activities, but this is not to say that they cannot be used for such activities. Because metal frames are more rigid, some models have spring loaded hinges to help them grip the wearer’s face better. The end of the resting hook and the bridge over the nose can be textured or have rubber or plastic material to improve hold. The ends of the resting hook are usually curved so that they wrap around the ear; however, some models have straight resting hooks. Frames can be made to hold the lenses in several different ways. There are three common styles: full frame, half frame, and frameless. Full frame glasses have the frame go all around the lenses. Half frames go around only half the lens; typically the frames attach to the top of the lenses and on the side near the top. Frameless glasses have no frame around the lenses and the ear stems are attached directly to the lenses. There are two styles of frameless glasses: those that have a piece of frame material connecting the two lenses, and those that are a single lens with ear stems on each side.   Nose bridges provide support between the lens and the face. They also prevent pressure marks caused by the weight of the lens or frame on the cheeks. People with large noses may need a low nose bridge on their sunglasses. People with medium noses may need a low or medium nose bridge. People with small noses may need sunglasses with high nose bridges to allow clearance.

Gradient lenses go from a darker shade at the top to a lighter one at the bottom, so there will be more protection from sunlight the higher one looks through the lens, but the lower one looks through the lens, the less protection is offered. An advantage is that one can wear them indoors without fear of tripping over something and also allowing the user to see. Wearing sunglasses to nightclubs has become common in recent times, where the gradient lens comes in handy. Gradient lenses may also be advantageous for activities such as flying airplanes and driving automobiles, as they allow the operator a clear view of the instrument panel, low in his line of sight and usually hidden in shadow, while still reducing glare from the view out the windscreen.

Mirrored lenses, having a metallic, partially reflective coating on the outer surface, combined with a tinted glass lens, are an alternative to polarization for UV protection, improving contrast when depth perception is important such as seeing moguls and ice while skiing or snowboarding. The mirrored lens reflects glare to protect the eyes, but improves the ability to see contrasts, and mirrored lenses of different colors can expand the range of fashion styles.

In the early twenty-first century moderately oversized sunglasses have become a fashion trend. There are many variations, such as the “Onassis”, discussed below, and Dior white sunglasses. Onassis glasses or “Jackie O’s” are very large sunglasses worn by women. This style of sunglasses is said to mimic the kind most famously worn by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis in the 1960s. The glasses continue to be popular with women, and celebrities may use them, ostensibly to hide from paparazzi.

Oversized sunglasses, because of their larger frames and lenses, are useful for individuals who are trying to minimize the apparent size or arch of their nose. Oversized sunglasses also offer more protection from sunburn due to the larger areas of skin they cover, although sunblock should still be used.

“Tea-shades” (sometimes also called “John Lennon glasses”, “Round Metal”, or, occasionally, “Granny Glasses”) were a type of psychedelic art wire-rim sunglasses that were often worn, usually for purely aesthetic reasons, by members of the 1960s counterculture. The original tea-shade design was made up of medium-sized, perfectly round lenses, supported by pads on the bridge of the nose and a thin wire frame. When tea-shades became popular in the late 1960s, they were often elaborated:    Lenses were elaborately colored, mirrored, and produced in excessively large sizes, and with the wire earpieces exaggerated. A uniquely colored or darkened glass lens was usually preferred. Modern versions tend to have plastic lenses, as do many other sunglasses. Tea-shades are hard to find in shops today; however, they can still be found at many costume Web sites and in some countries.

The Ray-Ban Wayfarer is a plastic-framed design for sunglasses produced by the Ray-Ban company. Introduced in 1952, the trapezoidal lenses are wider at the top than the bottom and were famously worn by James Dean, Roy Orbison, and other actors and singers. The original frames were black; frames in many different colors were later introduced. There is always a silver piece on the corners as well.

Wrap-around (sometimes also called “Yoko Ono glasses”) is a style of sunglasses characterized by being strongly curved, to wrap around the face. They may have a single curved semi-circular lens that covers both eyes and much of the same area of the face covered by protective goggles, usually with a minimal plastic frame and single piece of plastic serving as a nosepiece. Glasses described as wraparound may alternatively have two lenses, but again with a strongly curved frame.

Kathy Kiefer

WHAT IS PARIS HAUTE COUTURE?

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WHAT IS PARIS HAUTE COUTURE?

What makes Haute Couture and is it unique to Paris?   Is it a specific part of the Fashion Industry? Are there specific designers involved?

Haute couture was born in Paris in the mid-19th century and since then generations of designers have transformed this supposedly frivolous discipline into high art, drawing on the skill of thousands little hands, like those of the embroiderers and plumassiers (feather workers), whose work in the shadows has kept alive the traditions that help maintain Paris’ influence on fashion all over the world.

Haute couture (French for “high sewing” or “high dressmaking” or “high fashion”) refers to the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable seamstresses, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Couture translates literally from French as “dressmaking”, but may also refer to fashion, sewing, or needlework and is also used as a common abbreviation of haute couture and refers to the same thing in spirit. Haute translates literally to “high”. A haute couture garment is often made for a client, tailored specifically for the wearer’s measurements and body stance. Considering the amount of time, money, and skill that is allotted to each completed piece, haute couture garments are also described as having no price tag – in other words, budget is not relevant.

Haute couture is one of the most misused terms in fashion. Some of the uninitiated toss it around relentlessly in an ungainly belief that peppering your language with “exotic” French expressions will make you sound smarter while others abuse it because haute couture collections are way fancier than ready-to-wear, so everything that’s at least a bit fancy in the eye of the beholder automatically becomes “couture”:

The main misconception people have about the term haute couture is that it applies to all handmade and/or made-to-order garments, whether manufactured by seamstresses at Dior or aspiring fashion design students. This isn’t entirely incorrect, but it is a very loose interpretation of the term. Some fashion houses add to the confusion by falsely describing their special collections as “haute couture”; you’d think they should be the first ones making sure the term is used properly, but fashion industry probably fuels the mystery behind these two words on purpose as to create more buzz.

In modern France, haute couture is a protected name that can be used only by firms that meet certain well-defined standards. However, the term is also used loosely to describe all high-fashion custom-fitted clothing, whether it is produced in Paris or in one of the other fashion capitals.   The term can refer to: (a) the fashion houses or designers that create exclusive and often trend-setting fashions; and the fashions created.     What is haute couture in its narrowest sense?   The term haute couture is protected by law in France and is defined by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. To earn the right to call itself a couture house and to use the term haute couture in its advertising and any other way, a fashion house must follow these rules: (a) Design made-to-order for private clients, with one or more fittings; (b) Have a workshop (atelier) in Paris that employs at least fifteen people full-time; and (c) Each season (i.e. twice a year) present a collection to the Paris press, comprising at least thirty-five runs/exits with outfits for both daytime wear and evening wear.

Fashion houses meeting these rather challenging criteria (I have an unwavering desire to visit an haute couture atelier and observe the dressmakers’ meticulous work because I often feel like it is more interesting to be able to watch the design process in person) are selected each year by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and then become members of the Syndical Chamber for Haute Couture. However, even this most elite selection has its hierarchy – members are divided into “official” (French houses such as Chanel and Dior), “correspondent” (foreigners, most notably Armani and Valentino), “guest” (new talents), “jewelry” and “accessories”.

For the first time ever in Paris, fashion capital of the world, an exhibition is bringing together a hundred haute couture dresses and outfits by designers such as Worth, Doucet, Poiret, Lanvin, Chanel, Balenciaga, Givenchy, Grès, Jean Paul Gaultier, Lacroix, Alaïa and many more. Organized in collaboration with the Galliera Museum – under the artistic direction of Olivier Saillard – the Paris haute couture invites the viewer to admire these exceptional garments, chosen from the most beautiful pieces in the museum’s collections. A unique opportunity to discover a number of masterpieces, many of which have never been seen before.

The exhibition enjoys the exceptional support of Swarovski. This close collaboration began in 1900, when the designer Worth created garments embroidered with Swarovski crystals. Jeanne Lanvin, Gabrielle Chanel and Elsa Shiaparelli made sparing use of these crystals, whereas in the 50s, Jacques Fath and Cristobal Balenciaga used extravagant amount of crystals in their collections.

In France, the term haute couture is protected by law and is defined by the Chambre de       commerce et d’industrie de Paris based in Paris. The chambre syndicale de la haute couture is defined as “the regulating commission that determines which fashion houses are eligible to be true haute couture houses”. Their rules state that only “those companies mentioned on the list drawn up each year by a commission domiciled at the Ministry for Industry are entitled to avail themselves” of the label haute couture. The Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne is an association of Parisian couturiers founded in 1868 as an outgrowth of medieval guilds that regulate its members in regard to piracy of styles, dates of openings for collections, number of models presented, relations with press, questions of law and taxes, and promotional activities. An affiliated school was organized in 1930 called L’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture. The school helps bring new designers to help the “couture” houses that are still present today. Since 1975, this organization has worked within the Federation Francaise, de couture, du Prêt-à-Porter des Couturiers et des Createurs de Mode.

However, the term haute couture may have been misused by ready-to-wear brands since the late 1980s, so that its true meaning may have become blurred with that of pret-a-porter (the French term for ready-to-wear fashion) in the public perception. Every haute couture house also markets prêt-à-porter collections, which typically deliver a higher return on investment than their custom clothing. Falling revenues have forced a few couture houses to abandon their less profitable couture division and concentrate solely on the less prestigious prêt-à-porter. These houses are no longer considered haute couture.   Many top designer fashion houses, such as Chanel, use the word for some of their special collections. These collections are often not for sale or they are very difficult to purchase. Sometimes, “haute couture” is inappropriately used to label non-dressmaking activities, such as fine art, music and more.

Haute couture can be referenced back as early as the 1700s. Rose Bertin, the French fashion designer to Queen Marie Antoinette, can be credited for bringing fashion and haute couture to French culture. French leadership in European fashion continued into the 18th century when influence was sourced from art, architecture, music, and fashions of the French court at Versailles were imitated across Europe. Visitors to Paris brought back clothing that was then copied by local dressmakers. Stylish women also ordered fashion dolls dressed in the latest Parisian fashion to serve as models.     As railroads and steamships made European travel easier, it was increasingly common for wealthy women to travel to Paris to shop for clothing and accessories. French fitters and dressmakers were commonly thought to be the best in Europe, and real Parisian garments were considered better than local imitations.

In the 1960s, a group of young designers who had trained under men like Dior and Balenciaga left these established couture houses and opened their own establishments. The most successful of these young designers were Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin, Andre Courreges, Ted Lapidus and Emanuel Ungaro. Japanese native and Paris-based Hanae Mori was also successful in establishing her own line. Lacroix is one of the fashion houses to have been started in the late 20th century. Other new houses have included Jean-Paul Gaultier and Thierry Mugler. Due to the high expenses of producing haute couture collections, Lacroix and Mugler have since ceased their haute couture activities. Modernized haute couture shows are not designed and made to be sold, rather they are exactly what they are displayed for – show. Instead of being constructed for the purpose of selling and making money, they are made to further the publicity, as well as perception and understanding of brand image.

For all these fashion houses, custom clothing is no longer the main source of income, often costing much more than it earns through direct sales; it only adds the aura of fashion to their ventures in ready-to-wear clothing and related luxury products such as shoes and perfumes, and licensing ventures that earn greater returns for the company. Excessive commercialization and profit-making can be damaging, however. Cardin, for example, licensed with abandon in the 1980s and his name lost most of its fashionable cachet when anyone could buy Cardin luggage at a discount store. It is their ready-to-wear collections that are available to a wider audience, adding a splash of glamour and the feel of haute couture to more wardrobes.

The 1960s also featured a revolt against established fashion standards by mods, rockers, and hippies, as well as an increasing internationalization of the fashion scene. Jet travel had spawned a jet set that partied—and shopped—just as happily in New York as in Paris. Rich women no longer felt that a Paris dress was necessarily better than one sewn elsewhere. While Paris is still pre-eminent in the fashion world, it is no longer the sole arbiter of fashion.

Kathy Kiefer

HAUTE COUTURE

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HAUTE COUTURE

 

What does Haute Couture mean?   Are the outfits really worth the time and effort as well as the price?

Haute couture (French for “high sewing” or “high dressmaking” or “high fashion”) refers to the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is fashion that is constructed by hand (without the use of sewing machines and sergers/overlockers) from start to finish, made from high quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable seamstresses, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Couture translates literally from French as “dressmaking”, but may also refer to fashion, sewing, or needlework and is also used as a common abbreviation of haute couture and refers to the same thing in spirit. Haute translates literally to “high”. A haute couture garment is often made for a client, tailored specifically for the wearer’s measurements and body stance. Considering the amount of time, money, and skill that is allotted to each completed piece, haute couture garments are also described as having no price tag – in other words, budget is not relevant. Each couture piece is not made to sell. Rather, they were designed and constructed for the runway, much like an art exhibition.

The term originally referred to Englishman Charles Frederick Worth’s work, produced in Paris in the mid-nineteenth century. In modern France, haute couture is a “protected name” that can be used only by firms that meet certain well-defined standards. However, the term is also used loosely to describe all high-fashion custom-fitted clothing, whether it is produced in Paris or in other fashion capitals such as Milan, London, New York or Tokyo.    The term could also refer to: the fashion houses or fashion designers that create exclusive and often trend-setting fashions as well as the fashions created.   In France, the term haute couture is protected by law and is defined by the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Paris, located in Paris, France. The chambre syndicale de la haute couture is defined as “the regulating commission that determines which fashion houses are eligible to be true haute couture houses”. Their rules state that only “those companies mentioned on the list drawn up each year by a commission domiciled at the Ministry for Industry are entitled to avail themselves” of the label haute couture.   The Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne is an association of Parisian couturiers founded in 1868 as an outgrowth of medieval guilds that regulate its members in regard to piracy of styles, dates of openings for collections, number of models presented, relations with press, questions of law and taxes, and promotional activities. Formation of the organization was brought about by Charles Frederick Worth. An affiliated school was organized in 1930 called L’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture. The school helps bring new designers to help the “couture” houses that are still present today. Since 1975, this organization has worked within the Federation Francaise, de couture, du Prêt-à-Porter des Couturiers et des Createurs de Mode

The criteria for haute couture were established in 1945 and updated in 1992. To earn the right to call itself a couture house and to use the term haute couture in its advertising and any way, members of the Chambre syndicale de la haute couture must follow these rules: Design made-to-order for private clients, with one or more fittings; Have a workshop (atelier) in Paris that employs at least fifteen staff members full-time; Must have twenty, full-time technical people in at least one workshop; Every season, present a collection of at least fifty original designs to the public, both day and evening garments, in January and July of each year.

However, the term haute couture may have been misused by ready-to-wear brands since the late 1980s, so that its true meaning may have become blurred with that of pret-a-porter (the French term for ready-to-wear fashion) in the public perception. Every haute couture house also markets prêt-à-porter collections, which typically deliver a higher return on investment than their custom clothing.   Falling revenues have forced a few couture houses to abandon their less profitable couture division and concentrate solely on the less prestigious prêt-à-porter. These houses are no longer considered haute couture.

The fabrics available to the couture house are very luxurious and include the latest novelty fabrics as well as   expensive silks, fine wools, cashmeres, cottons, linens, leather, suede as well as other skins or furs.   In the case of a famous design house, the design and colour of a cloth may be exclusively reserved for that couture house.

Outside specialists make accessories either by design or inspiration. Hats, trimmings, buttons, belts, costume jewelry, shoes and innovative pieces are finely crafted to complement the fabrics and fashion ideas being created.   Superb craftsmanship, a fresh idea and publicized internationally renowned names all command a price to match.   Those able to afford couture are happy to pay for exclusivity and the privacy afforded by the system.

Designers crate their initial designs either by using muslin, which drapes well for flowing designs or by using linen canvas or calico for more structured garments as tailed garments. These sample models are calls toiles and save using very expensive fabrics that can cost upwards of $100.00 or more a yard.   Thus, the toile could be manipulated, marked and adjusted to fit a particular live model’s measurements until the designer and staff is satisfied.   The final toile of a design idea is an accurate interpretation of the line or cut right now to the button placement or hemline that the specific designer is seeking.   Once the designer is satisfied, he/she will instruct the staff to make up the garment in the selected and exclusive materials.   One seamstress or tailor will work on the garment from start to finish.   The cutting and finishing is done in one room and the workroom manager(s) is responsible for everything that is produced in that room.

Many top designer fashion houses, such as Chanel, use the word for some of their special collections. These collections are often not for sale or they are very difficult to purchase. Sometimes, “haute couture” is inappropriately used to label non-dressmaking activities, such as fine art, music and more.   The art of haute couture is one that is rooted in tradition and heritage – and, as such, only a handful of designers are privileged enough to work within its rarefied realm. For many years, the industry has been dominated by established maisons such as Chanel, Valentino and Christian Dior, but this is quickly changing as a new generation of couturiers has emerged.     Unlike their predecessors, this small group of designers is armed with a modern vision that is bringing the craft into the 21st century. With styles ranging from high fantasy to utilitarian minimalism, they are creating modern yet wearable silhouettes that appeal to new audiences in China, Russia and the Middle East.

From the moment a client is received at the salon, they are helped and humored through all the stages of fitting and any sudden difficulties.   For example, a difficulty could be another client from the same city who wants the exact same design and color garment for a prestigious function.   The vendeuse (manager) smoothes out such problems knowing full well what a disaster it could be for two pay a vast sum of money for an exclusive haute couture item only to bump into an acquaintance at the same function, wearing the identical outfit.

Sometimes designers work for their own label and at times they work for a famous Haute Couture house.   Very few couture model sales are made a year, and these rarely total more than 1500 sales for each house.   However, this is not really surprising when you learn that about only 3000 women or so worldwide can actually afford to buy clothes at the highest level, and fewer than 300 buy regularly.   Because of this, Haute Couture actually runs at a loss.   Design houses present expensive million dollar fashion shows of outrageous noticeable designs intermixed with exquisite garments on supermodels.   The couture house sells only a very limited percentage of Haute Couture model garments to a contracting number of customers.   The profits from this activity are negligible, amounting to less than 10% of gross profits of the couture name or even at a loss.   One might wonder then what is the point of it all for so low a percentage sale in relation to effort and deadlines.   The answer lies in the phrase “selling a dream.” The fashion show attracts huge media attention and gains enormous publicity for the couture houses. They sell a dream of the intangible.   A dream of chic cachet, of beauty, desirability and exclusiveness that the ordinary person can buy into.

If a consumer can afford the bottle of perfume, the scarf, the designer boutique jewelry, the bag of the season, the couture named cosmetics or the ready to wear “designer label” products the convince themselves they are just as exclusive as the 1000 women and supermodels who regularly wear Haute Couture model gowns.   It is fair to say that the goods are usually of very high quality, so many people are happy to pay a price that they feel reflects the image and standard.   But, if this is all way beyond your means and part of the fantasy, why not get one of the many online catalogues featuring clothes for real people.

Couture Front for Ready to Wear, Beauty and Perfume Haute Couture is the prestigious front for French creative fashion and original design. IN turn, the ready to wear and couture house beauty industry employs a huge work force for the many lower level sales of perfume and accessories.   This makes for large profits for the couture design house through the volume of mass market international sales.

In a typical fashion show, models walk the catwalk dressed in the clothing created by the designer. Occasionally, fashion shows take the form of installations, where the models are static, standing or sitting in a constructed environment. The order in which each model walks out wearing a specific outfit is usually planned in accordance to the statement that the designer wants to make about his or her collection. It is then up to the audience to not only try to understand what the designer is trying to say by the way the collection is being presented, but to also visually deconstruct each outfit and try to appreciate the detail and craftsmanship of every single piece. A wide range of contemporary designers tend to produce their shows as theatrical productions with elaborate sets and added elements such as live music or a variety of technological components like holograms.

Kathy kiefer

DIFFERENT FORMS/TYPES OF MODELING

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DIFFERENT FORMS/TYPES OF MODELING

the-ideal-male-body-weight-chart-attractiveness-2Fitness modeling focuses on displaying a healthy tone physique. Fitness models usually have defined muscle groups both major and minor groups. The models’ body weight is heavier due to muscle weighing more than fat; however, they have a lower body fat percentage because the muscles are toned and sculpted. Fitness models are advertised in magazines. Sometimes they are certified personal fitness trainers. However, many athletes are fitness models. There are several agencies in large markets such as New York, London, Germany that have fitness modeling agencies. While there is a large market for these models, most of these agencies are a secondary agency promoting these models who typically earn their primary income as commercial models.

Commercial models generally appear in print ads for non-fashion products, as well as television commercials. Commercial print models can earn up to $250 an hour. These models are usually non-exclusive, and primarily work in one location.   There are several large fashion agencies that have commercial print divisions, including Ford Models in the United States.

A promotional model is a model hired to drive consumer demand for a product, service, brand, or concept by directly interacting3D_Male body typeline up front_c with potential consumers. A vast majority of promotional models typically tend to be attractive in physical appearance. They serve to provide information about the product or service and make it appealing to consumers. While the length of interaction may be short, the promotional model delivers a live experience that reflects on the product or service he or she is representing. This form of marketing touches fewer consumers for the cost than traditional advertising media (such as print, radio, and television); however the consumer’s perception of a brand, product, service, or company, is often more profoundly affected by a live person-to-person experience.

Marketing campaigns that make use of promotional models may take place in stores or shopping malls, at trade shows, special promotional events, clubs, or even at outdoor public spaces. They are often planned at high traffic locations to reach as many consumers as possible, or at venues at which a particular type of target consumer is expected to be present.

“Spokes-model” is a term used for a model who is employed to be associated with specific brands in advertisements. A spokes-model may be a celebrity used only in advertisements (in contrast to a “brand ambassador,” who is also expected to represent the company at various events), but more often the term refers to a model who is not a celebrity in their own right.  Classic examples of such spokes-models are those models engaged to be the Marlboro Man between 1954 and 1999.

Trade show models work a trade show floor-space or booth, and represent a company to attendees. Trade show models are typically not regular employees of the company, but are freelancers hired by the company renting the booth space. They are hired for several reasons. Trade show models make a company’s booth more visibly distinguishable from the hundreds of other booths with which it competes for attendee attention. Also, trade show models are articulate and quickly learn and explain or disseminate information on the company and its product and service, and can assist a company in handling a large number of attendees which the company might otherwise not have enough employees to accommodate, therefore increasing the number of sales or leads resulting from participation in the show.

A convention model is an assistant that works with a company’s sales representatives at a trade show exhibit. They are used to draw in attendees and provide them with basic information about their product or services. Convention models may be used to distribute marketing materials or gather customer information for future promotions.

artist_and_model_iv-hugeArt models pose for any visual artist as part of the creative process. Art models are often paid, highly skilled human subjects, who aid in creating any work of art that includes the human figure. The most common types of art created using models are figure drawing, figure painting, sculpture and photography, almost any medium may be used. Although commercial motives dominate over aesthetics in illustration, its artwork commonly employs models. An example would be that Norman Rockwell used his friends and neighbors as models for both his commercial and fine art work. Models are most frequently employed for art classes or by informal groups of experienced artists that gather to share the expense of a model. Models are also employed by artists.

Throughout the history of Western art, drawing the human figure from living models was considered the most useful way to develop the skill of draftsmanship. First, it is best to draw from real objects, rather than copying two dimensional images. Second, an artist has a connection to drawing another human being that cannot exist with any other subject. Models for life drawing classes are usually nude, to provide for an unobstructed anatomical study. This may be referred to as being “undraped” or “disrobed”. Art models who pose in the nude for life drawings are also called life models or figure models. In the classroom setting, where the purpose is to learn how to draw the human form in all the different shapes, ages and ethnicity, there are no real limitations on who the model can be. In some cases, the model may pose with various props, one or more other models, against real or artificial background, in natural or artificial light and so on.

The role of art models has changed through different eras as the meaning and importance of the human figure in art and society has changed. More than being simply the subject of art, models are often thought of as muses, a source of inspiration without whom a particular work of art might not exist. Many models gain a sense of self-esteem from contributing to the fine arts, something with high culture capital. At the same time nude models must deal with the larger society’s assumptions regarding sexuality and nudity.

tendenze-moda-autunno-inverno-2015-dalla-milano-fashion-week_164116_bigA model earns different rates for different types of work. For instance, a model will earn his or her day rate for editorial print. For catalog work, a model can earn anywhere from $200 to $300 an hour. Depending on the length of the assignment, a model can earn anywhere from $1,200.00 to $3,500.00 for a day’s work. A typical catalog shoot lasts anywhere from 2 to 5 days. Fashion print, otherwise known as print campaigns, can yield $250 per hour. Advertisements for non-fashion related products will earn a model anywhere from $500.00 to $1,200.00 for a day. Swimwear and Lingerie pays the most with an average $400.00 day rate for an editorial. Lingerie and Swimwear catalog can pay $7,000.00 day rate and up. Lifestyle print yields a day rate of $400.00 to $950.00.

Fragrance and exclusive designer advertising campaigns are the most lucrative. For men, high-end catalog photo shoots pay an average of $8,000 to $15,000 per day and typically last one day. For women, models for luxury brand campaigns are paid from $40,000 to $1,000,000 and fragrance campaigns pay from $100,000 to $1,000,000.    Contract supermodels for larger cosmetic brands are generally paid $300,000 to $2 million a year, depending on exclusivity and the amount of days the model is expected to work. A multiyear, multimillion dollar contract as a Victoria’s Secret “angel” is considered the most prestigious in the industry. The most established and famous print models can make hundreds of thousands of dollars per year, not only from modelling but also from personal appearances and merchandise, such as calendars or exercise videos.     A model’s rate for commercials can range anywhere from $2000 and up, not including residuals. The amount of money a model can earn off of residuals depends on how long the campaign runs and where it runs.

Fashion Week happens twice a year in most markets. Each market has their own fashion week. Models can earn $250.00 per hour and up. Runway models are expected to attend fittings as well as the show. Agencies usually limit the amount of shows younger models participate in due to the chaos of fashion week. Established models can walk in up to 20 shows in one fashion week. Top runway models can make $200,000 per season, but often the model will not continue finding work once the season is over.   On the other hand, there are models who are paid large sums for exclusives.   Exclusives are coveted as they help launch and propel high fashion careers.

The most famous male models earn from $200,000 to $500,000 per year. Most make a less glamorous living from catalog workSchermata 2015-01-11 alle 17.03.01. Fragrance and exclusive designer advertising campaigns are the most lucrative. A male model can earn from $8,000 to $15,000 for high-end catalog photo shoots, which last one day. In 1996, the highest-paid male model reportedly made $1 million per year.

Commercial print models usually look more or less like an average person, they are not as hard to find. There is a great volume of work done in this field, but there are significantly more commercial print models and actors available than the amount of work that is offered. Commercial print models earn $75.00 to $150.00 per hour with day rate $400.00 to $950.00, but the models do not work as often as the most successful fashion models. Print advertisements for real-people models have a daily rate of $500.00 to $1,200.00.   Print models who work with an agent give 15% to 20% of earnings to the agent. Depending on the market and the agency, a commercial print model can earn $10,000 to $40,000 a year or more depending on how much work they land.

10934637_10203778891208418_1949121574_nAs there are so many glamour models, it is incredibly difficult landing enough jobs to earn a steady salary. While the average nude model can earn $600 for an editorial in a men’s magazine, the jobs are few and far between. As there are no specific qualifications or other requirements, glamour models are easily replaceable. According to the British press, an average glamour model can earn £10,000. In England, the best paying nude jobs are appearing in Page 3 of tabloid newspapers such as The Sun.   A Page 3 regular can earn £30,000 – as much as the average fashion model.   However, very few models regularly work for Page 3. Top glamour models earn a £100,000 a year in comparison to a top fashion model who can earn millions. There are adult lingerie catalogs where a glamour model can earn about $4,000 a day, but there is not enough glamour catalog work to go around. Obtaining that type of work is difficult depending on what market you work in. As many markets do not have glamour modelling agencies, many glamour models are freelance, meaning they have to find work themselves. The lucky ones are represented by commercial print or talent agencies.

Since promotional modeling usually occurs at night or on the weekends, commercial print models usually moonlight as promotional models to help supplement their salary. However, you do not have to be a working model in order to be a promotional model. A promotional model can earn anywhere from $15.00 to $30.00 per hour. There are very few promotional modeling agencies in the world.   Aspiring promotional models should be aware of scams. Other forms of promotional model include trade show modeling can merit a day rate of $200. However, it is expected for the model to manage the booth which includes answering question about the service or product. Convention modeling is the same as trade show modeling. The only difference is the amount of money spent of the presentation. The models are educated on the product or service and are expected to use presentation aids. Trade show models can earn $1,000 to $4,000. All types of promotional are sporadic and can’t be used to earn a living.

Kathy kiefer

WHITE FASHION SHOW – MILAN

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WHITE FASHION SHOW – MILAN

What is the White Fashion Show all about?

Is it as important as the other fashion weeks?

In Italy, one of the best places to find new things definitely is the White Show in Milan. And despite the fact that Milan fashion week schedule is particularly busy, you should find some time for a visit , looking for novelty and charm: very often, it is from there that new season trends come. If you plan to be in Milan next June, be sure to put the White Show in your agenda: you will not regret it !

Recently the WHITE trade show took place in Milan, bringing together over 17,000 buyers and prestigious multi-brand stores worldwide to see up and coming international high end and niche label brands. The expo provides a platform for a multitude of designers, stylists and artists to show off and take their work to the next level.

The WHITE trade show started out in 2000 as a small show for high quality womenswear’s collections but now it has grown to feature menswear collections and accessories as well, thus becoming one of fashion’s benchmark events. WHITE differs from other trade shows due to its unique eco-friendly take on display elements and general avant-garde atmosphere of the fair. WHITE has recently added a new section that focuses on denim, hosting four global brands, namely PRPS, Koral Los Angeles, Kuro and Hudson.

WHITE is the international contemporary fashion showcase, but also a cultural reference for a generation of designers, stylists and artists who consider the fair in via Tortona 27 and 54 an extraordinary take-off field. Attended by more than 16.000 buyers from the most important multi-brands in the world, White is on the one hand a prestigious platform for niche brands, on the other hand it is becoming an ideal stage for all those Italian and international innovative fashion companies which recognize themselves in the White character, in the stimulating mix of creativity, harmony and eco-ethical commitment.

A structure capable of bringing to the fore an accurate selection of fashion trends, merged into a complete stunning range of products, edition after edition White is standing out in the fashion scene and in the Milan metropolitan environment as a container of ideas and services that go beyond the concept of season.

 White is a breeding ground of ideas, it is fashion culture as a lifestyle which embraces art, design, music, communication and the new frontiers of the web.

White is the junction and meeting point for the different protagonists of retail trade and it is structured to ease and speed up the work of buyers and showroom owners; over the years, it has become a veritable network that gathers in Milan, the world capital of fashion, the most important players of the fashion system.

Thus, White Suite was created, a special section of premium companies that will occupy the exhibition areas of Hotel Nhow in Via Tortona 35, based on a concept echoing the aesthetic DNA of White in a concentration of very high-profile, contemporary work. With this project, featuring leading companies from the international market, White has increased the prestige of the Via Tortona area, already a go-to centre for the fashion public for over a decade and a unique, true and undisputed fashion & design district much loved by top retailers from all over the world.

Among the many events and exclusive collections, White presents “White Pony Rocco Bag” of young American talent Alexander Wang at the helm of one of the most prestigious contemporary fashion designers on the world stage and present for the first time exclusively to the Milan event.

It is worth noting that the White Show is not only fashion but also encompasses cosmetics, events, design and art at 360 degrees for a trip in style and contemporary taste, which is why in the space of the former Ansaldo appointment during the weekend you can visit the photo exhibition” Competition Milan Suburbs – Travel in suburban areas of Milan, “the photographer Stephen Guidan devised to describe the suburbs of Milan as seen through the eyes of twenty creative. An event not to be missed and that we recommend, a poem consisting of portraits, people, neighborhoods, history, architecture, design that allows you to better understand what fashion sin means and contemporary mood.

Once it could be said that diamonds are a girl’s best friend, now many think that they are the bags. The new trend is called neoprene and has been observed at the White Show in Milan.

The White Show is an eye on fashion and the world.   I’d like to think that Italian fashion does not stop at the catwalks of Milan Fashion Week, but it is still able to be at the forefront. So many people from all over the world, industrial buildings restored and turned into modern and sophisticated location and great accessories design.

There is no better city than Milan to have a trade show of this caliber because it is the fashion capital of the world. Fashionistas around the world look to Milan for the latest trends and news, especially since it is home to many famous designers, such as Giorgio Armani, Prada and Gianni Versace. Therefore, the international brands can take advantage of this extra visibility to promote their work further.

I have found that The White Trade Show is one of the most relevant fashion/trade shows today and is getting much more important year after year. In this show, the coolest and most innovative brands and designers from all over the world show their latest collections to buyers and manufacturers. Also many designers come to see new fresh ideas and emerging talents.
As it is on at the same time as Fashion Week, the kind of people you see there are the professionals that work in this sector.

There is also an interior design concept that takes place at “Superstudio piu” spaces at via Tortona, the fashion quarter in Milan right in the middle of the showrooms, the coolest restaurants and stores.

Kathy Kiefer